Joe Daniels

AD00004Ever since I can remember I have been fascinated by the underwater world and the creatures that live in it. I can remember looking through photographs that my father had  taken  whilst  diving  in the Maldives and knowing that I wanted to spend as much time    as possible underwater.  As soon as I left school I volunteered for a Marine conservation expedition in the Seychelles. This is where I first started taking photographs underwater with a supposedly ‘waterproof’ digital compact. I spent every free moment snorkeling with my camera just taking snap shots of the myriad tropical fish and corals. So after six months on the expedition I was completely hooked on underwater photography. After the Seychelles I completed my Divemaster course back in the UK then travelled to Australia. The majority of my time I spent working on diving and snorkeling boats on Ningaloo Reef. By this time I had already upgraded to a basic Canon compact with a housing which, I then sold to buy a housing for my father’s old Canon G9. This camera opened up a whole new world for me, photography wise, and is where I really homed my skills as a underwater photographer. I never went out on a boat without my camera and took full advantage of having the Ningaloo Reef as my training ground.

Ningaloo gave me a huge amount of experience not only photographically, but as a diver and deckhand. I now work on the Marine Conservation Expedition I volunteered for back in 2007 and have upgraded to a housed DSLR. I still spend every spare moment snorkeling with my camera in hand. Although I spend my working week diving, I prefer free diving in order to capture the images I am after. This allows me to get closer and spend more time with my subjects. Most of my images are wide angle using a Tokina 10-17mm fish eye lens, although the introduction of a 60mm Macro lens to my kit has opened my eyes to the possibilities of macro photography.

I have spent every available opportunity of the past year free diving and photographing the rich and diverse marine life that can be found within the Marine Parks of North West Mahe, Seychelles.

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